TEST to main content First level navigation Menu
Stack of newspaper

Case Study: National Newspaper

A subscription to the new world of work with a digital library and rightsized fleet.

Ricoh Bubble logo insert
 
 

Challenge

 

Challenge

 
Newspaper printing press
With a move to a smaller, modern open office space looming, this newspaper had to quickly declutter and rethink their document printing. Millions of legacy paper documents couldn't go with the move, and a culture firmly ingrained in paper had to make a seismic shift. Security protocols around printing had led to dedicated printers among small employee groups, a bloated fleet and frequent IT calls. Further complicating the move, the new facility wouldn't be able to accommodate the onsite print center, managed by Ricoh, that produced quick-turn, high quality ad proofs for the daily newspaper and weekend edition wraps.
 
 

The question quickly became, what would the newspaper do with all the paper in the building and how would they handle printing going forward? The answer was clear — they needed to move from a very paper-centric environment to a paperless one.

 
 
 

Solution

 

Solution

 
 

The new world of work was colliding with this newspaper's old way of doing business. At nearly half the square footage of the old building, their new facility couldn't hold file cabinets with decades of accumulated paper documents. The large printing fleet couldn't be justified, and stacks of paper waste wouldn't be tolerated. The newspaper needed a partner to quickly digitize their legacy paper documents and implement a new streamlined printing infrastructure to fit their new environment.

 
 
First, our team helped troubleshoot and configure a FortisBlue™ document management system to house all the new digital files. Then, onsite scanning of the voluminous legacy information began — however, a once comfortable year-plus timeline to complete all the scanning was suddenly reduced to less than a year, forcing us to speed up our efforts.

Simultaneously, we cut the newspaper's printing fleet in half and equipped MFPs with Equitrac® print management software and Follow-Me print capability with employee ID card authentication at the device. RICOH Device Manager NX was added to monitor fleet toner levels and @Remote was installed for automatic meter readings and department chargebacks.

To produce the ad proofs and other production print materials without delay, our team carved out space at a nearby facility and relocated our existing print shop equipment and staff. We implemented our TRAC web-based job submission technology for fast, easy order placement, dedicated one of our team members to check in at the newspaper every morning and arranged for courier deliveries twice daily.
 

About National Newspaper

This major daily newspaper serving the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. has a long and storied history, covering everything from national and international news to local events, pop culture and sports. With staff at both international and local bureaus, the newspaper is circulated to hundreds of thousands of daily subscribers.
 
 

Result

Our team scanned more than one million images into the newspaper's new document management solution — taking them from a paper-based filing system to a fully functioning digital library in just 10 months.

Over the course of just two days, we delivered and installed 48 new MFPs at the newspaper's new office and simultaneously removed nearly 120 MFPs, printers and production print devices at the old space. All employee training was done within a week, making for a very smooth, successful transition.

Now, the newspaper's employees are fully immersed in the new world of work, and even many veteran staffers have become advocates of the new printing technology. Their IT department has fewer print-related issues, and now needs just one print driver to manage the entire fleet. The software solutions installed on the new MFPs have reduced printing, eliminated paper waste, improved security and lowered print costs — including paper, toner and clicks — by nearly 30 percent.